Questions

What backup solution would be most appropriate for this use case?


You’re running an application on-premises due to its dependency on non-x86 hardware and want to use AWS
for data backup. Your backup application is only able to write to POSIX-compatible block-based storage. You
have 140TB of data and would like to mount it as a single folder on your file server Users must be able to
access portions of this data while the backups are taking place. What backup solution would be most
appropriate for this use case?

A.
Use Storage Gateway and configure it to use Gateway Cached volumes.

B.
Configure your backup software to use S3 as the target for your data backups.

C.
Configure your backup software to use Glacier as the target for your data backups.

D.
Use Storage Gateway and configure it to use Gateway Stored volumes.



Discussion

30 Responses to “What backup solution would be most appropriate for this use case?”

  1. Sandeep says:

    C is correct.

    A,D is wrong because Storage Gateway has a max limit on how much you can store:

    https://aws.amazon.com/storagegateway/faqs/
    Q: What is the maximum size of a volume?

    Each gateway-cached volume can store up to 32 TB of data. Data written to the volume is cached on your on-premises hardware and asynchronously uploaded to AWS for durable storage.

    Each gateway-stored volume can store up to 16 TB of data. Data written to the volume is stored on your on-premises hardware and asynchronously backed up to AWS for point-in-time snapshots.

    B is wrong because it says “Your backup application is only able to write to POSIX-compatible block-based storage.” S3 is object based storage.

  2. Manu says:

    Hello Mike

    I also think the same way Mike, the twist in the question is that “140TB of data and would like to mount it as a single folder on your file server”
    which makes me think that again, C would be the answer

    any new thoughts ?

  3. muthu says:

    Is possible to mount “Multiple volumes” with single mount point in storage gateway volumes? Like in traditional file system?

  4. DakkuDaddy says:

    I believe the answer is D as the question mentions clearly about backup. Although A sounds kinda intriguing but D is more relevant.

    D. Use Storage Gateway and configure it to use Gateway Stored volumes.

    https://aws.amazon.com/storagegateway/faqs/

    Gateway-Stored volumes store your primary data locally, while asynchronously backing up that data to AWS. These volumes provide your on-premises applications with low-latency access to their entire data sets, while providing durable, off-site backups.

    No mention of backups in Gateway cached volumes, although somewhat close with snapshots but again not that relevant.

    • sabarinath says:

      Answer is D from the link

      https://aws.amazon.com/storagegateway/faqs/

      What is volume gateway?

      Volume gateway provides an iSCSI target, which enables you to create volumes and mount them as iSCSI devices from your on-premises application servers. The volume gateway runs in either a cached or stored mode.

      In the cached mode, your primary data is written to S3, while you retain some portion of it locally in a cache for frequently accessed data.
      In the stored mode, your primary data is stored locally and your entire dataset is available for low-latency access while asynchronously backed up to AWS.
      In either mode, you can take point-in-time snapshots of your volumes and store them in Amazon S3, enabling you to make space-efficient versioned copies of your volumes for data protection and various data reuse needs.

  5. Sharon Zhou says:

    I think you need to backup using your backup application, instead of using aws backup, so A,D are incorrect. Since your application can only write to block-based storage, you need to backup to Glacier instead of S3. So C is the right answer

  6. abstar says:

    D is correct in my opinion – note 140TB on a single folder can only be achieved with on premise storage.And, Users must be able to access portions of this data while the backups are taking place.

    A is incorrect – Cached volume: can support 20 volume, upto 32tb in size and mount them as iscsi and total volume storage upto 150TB

    I would have gone with C if the question had archive or VTS word mentioned.

    • abstar says:

      Sorry Guys C is correct.

      Cached volume: can support 20 volume, upto 32tb in size and mount them as iscsi and total volume storage upto 150TB

      Stored volume: using on premise storage. You can create storage volume upto 1 Tb in size. Each storage gateway configured can support up to 1 volumes 12TB in total

  7. Kamran says:

    The key condition to keep in mind, 140TB mounted as a single volume, none of the three other answers satisfy that condition except for C.

    • Xhaka says:

      Hi Kamran, if ‘C’ is the answer, can you please explain how the “140TB mounted as a single volume” requirement is met? My understanding is that only ‘A’ and ‘D’ provide the ability to “mount a volume”. I believe the answer is ‘D’, because of the reasons people have already mentioned here.

  8. Kamran says:

    On a second thought, I would go with D, I agree with Xhaka and others who chose D.

  9. Manish says:

    A. You cannot use cached storage for posix compatible storage. It will corrupt data from cache loss.
    B. & C. You cannot use S3 as a posix compatible strage.

    D. It can be used a Posix compatible storage and Each gateway-stored volume can store up to 16 TB of data. Data written to the volume is stored on your on-premises hardware and asynchronously backed up to AWS for point-in-time snapshots.
    Each gateway-stored gateway can support up to 32 volumes for a maximum of 512 TB of data (32 volumes, each 16 TB in size).

    Answer is D.

  10. Sail says:

    C is definitely not correct.
    “Users must be able to access portions of this data while the backups are taking place.”
    To glacier? It takes 3 – 4 hours to retrieve data.

  11. Olajide says:

    Please lets not forget that “Users must be able to
    access portions of this data while the backups are taking place”
    Definitely A

  12. Olajide says:

    then again Manish has a good point
    Seems it is D

  13. Haofei says:

    Answer: D

    Analysis:
    The answer is between A and D, as S3 is an object storage, and I found all the materials and couldn’t find the prove that Glacier is a block-level storage. It seems like Glacier is also a cheaper Object Storage. Thus, B and C is incorrect

    we need to pay attention to some details
    (1) “140TB of data and would like to mount it as a single folder on your file server”
    – 140TB is the total data size, not mentioning that is a single volume size
    – mounting it is all to do with the local storage, nothin to do with the backup solution to AWS. Thus, all the choices (ABCD) can satisfy the “mounting” requirement

    (2) Users must be able to access portions of this data while the backups are taking place
    – Again , this is on the on-premise storage, nothing to do with the access on the backup

    Between A and D, Option A, data is not stored in on-premise storage, therefore, answer is only D, which storage is still in local.

    “In the cached volume mode, your data is stored in Amazon S3 and a cache of the frequently accessed data is maintained locally by the gateway. With this mode, you can achieve cost savings on primary storage, and minimize the need to scale your storage on-premises, while retaining low-latency access to your most used data.

    In the stored volume mode, data is stored on your local storage with volumes backed up asynchronously as Amazon EBS snapshots stored in Amazon S3. This provides durable and inexpensive off-site backups. You can recover these backups locally to your gateway or in-cloud to Amazon EC2, for example, if you need replacement capacity for disaster recovery.

  14. Joe says:

    I think its D as well

    Cached Volumes are basically using SG to become your primary data storage with only recently accessed data retained

    Stored Volumes are in effect a backup solution – data can still be accessed whilst it is being asychrnously copied to S3 by SG

    The fact it says backup makes me think its D

  15. Dong Liang says:

    Answer: D

    S3 and Glacier are both object storage, so B and C are wrong.

    Cached volumes will store your data in S3, So A is wrong.

  16. Ashok says:

    Yes, I think D is correct because A store in S3. But Store is first accessible in local then aws. B or C totally incorrect

  17. Amit says:

    Please note the keywords
    140TB of data in a single folder on the file server This calls for some kind of gateway device
    Portion of data needs to be accessed

    In cached volume your ISCI target can act as a 140TB datastore while it caches only the relevant info

    The device capacity itslef need not be 140TB

    Answer A:

  18. Zane says:

    Ans is D. Stored volumes provide backup capabilities.

    Cached volumes – You store your data in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) and retain a copy of frequently accessed data subsets locally. Cached volumes offer a substantial cost savings on primary storage and minimize the need to scale your storage on-premises. You also retain low-latency access to your frequently accessed data.

    Stored volumes – If you need low-latency access to your entire data set, you can configure your on-premises gateway to store all your data locally and then asynchronously back up point-in-time snapshots of this data to Amazon S3. This configuration provides durable and inexpensive off-site backups that you can recover to your local data center or Amazon EC2. For example, if you need replacement capacity for disaster recovery, you can recover the backups to Amazon EC2.

  19. deathless says:

    D

  20. Sumit Kumar says:

    D

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