How will vSphere 5 licensing impact their upgrade? (Choose two

A company is planning an upgrade from vSphere 4.x to vSphere 5. They currently have three dual CPU servers licensed for ESXi 4.1 Advanced

Each server has 256GB of RAM installed.

Their virtual machines are sized three ways.

Light. 1v CPU, 4GB RAM

Medium. 2v CPU, 8GB RAM

Heavy. 4 vCPU, 12GB RAM

The Production workload consists of.

20 Light servers

20 Medium servers

2 Heavy servers

The Development workload consists of.

10 Light servers

10 Medium servers

How will vSphere 5 licensing impact their upgrade? (Choose two.)

A.
They will need to purchase additional ESXi licenses.

B.
They will be able to reduce their power consumption.

C.
They will be restricted from powering on additional virtual machines.

D.
A license upgrade will be needed to add vCPUs to the Heavy servers.

10 Comments on “How will vSphere 5 licensing impact their upgrade? (Choose two

    1. GzBz says:

      This question should be pulled from current exams because vmware did away with their stupid vRAM pricing model… and that’s what this question is really all about.

      4.1 Advanced -> 5.x Enterprise
      5.x Enterprise = 64GB vRAM per socket
      6 sockets * 64GB vRAM per socket = 384 GB vRAM entitlement

      30 light * 4GB + 30 medium * 8GB + 2 heavy * 12GB = 384 GB used

  1. Khan says:

    Indeed, i’m trying to see the math yet am coming up short. Where is the calculation at the deems no more VM’s can be spun up?

  2. Xelor says:

    Old config.============

    ESXi 4.1 Advanced supporting
    1 pCPU / 12 vCPU
    256 RAM

    From the license model description licenses 4.1 Advaced were Upgrade to 5.0 Enterprise. The new lices model from the document located at:

    http://www.vmware.com/files/pdf/vsphere_pricing.pdf

    you may learn that

    “VMware vSphere 5 is licensed on a per-processor basis.”

    So if we have 3 machines with 1pCPU on each machine there fore we do not need additional licenses for ESX. So answer A is dropped.

    As the new vsphere 5.0 Enterprise model has limitations up to 32vCPU/VM. So based on that you if you not want to have more than 32vCPU on heavy server (very unlikely) you may dropped this answer too.

    However I not sure why “company will be able to reduce power consumption” just from simple upgrade? Physical Server and virtual servers are just the same. Or is just overall meaning that virtualization provides power saving by consolidating servers.

    I am also not sure how company will be restricted from “powering on additional virtual machines”. Based on the document described above there is no more physical resources limitation exept pCPU.

    Any ideas?

    1. Harold Rodriguez says:

      Hi Xelor,

      You are on the right track. The difference between 4.x and 5.x in the licensing is that the 4.x is limited to 6 cores only this means that you have to put less virtual machines than a host running 5.x which you can put 8 cores. more hosts = more power consumption. The other question I have no idea.

  3. Xelor says:

    As the new vsphere 5.0 Enterprise model has limitations up to 32vCPU/VM. So based on that you if you not want to have more than 32vCPU on heavy server (very unlikely) you may dropp D answer too.

  4. CentimC says:

    They will have six ESX 5.x Enterprise pCPU licenses with vRAM entitlement of 384GB (6X64GB) when upgrading from 4.1 Standard. All the vRAM will be used by the current VMs and they will not be able to start up any more.

  5. Ricky says:

    CentimC is right. If you check the official VSphere Pricing document page 7, Figure.4 states that vSphere 4.x Advanced and Enterprise versions are entitled to vSphere 5.0 Enterprise version. From this, we can deduct 64GB vRAM and 8-way vCPU entitlements. Good luck with the rest of the calculation.

  6. DCW says:

    B & C are correct.

    For B: there was no DPM in vSphere 4.1 Advanced, so moving to vSphere 5 Enterprise allowed for the organization to (in theory at least) reduce power consumption.


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