Which three requirements must be met, in order to use Storage I/O Control?

Which three requirements must be met, in order to use Storage I/O Control? (Choose three.)

A.
The datastore must contain a single VMFS extent

B.
The datastore must contain a single NFS volume

C.
The datastore must not include virtual machines with snapshots

D.
The datastore must be managed by a single vCenter Server

E.
Array-based automated storage tiering must be explicitly certified

Explanation:

Extents are only a single extent – not multiples. Also, because NFS is not VMFS it does not use extents. You grow the NFS from the actual NAS appliance itself with extents.

Page 42 from:
vsphere-esxi-vcenter-server-50-resource-management-guide.pdf

11 Comments on “Which three requirements must be met, in order to use Storage I/O Control?

  1. firebird says:

    I think the answer “A” is not correct because SIOC does not support datastores with extents even though it is just one extent.
    So, the better answer would be letter “B” (single NFS volume).

  2. hyh says:

    hi firebird:
    it seems that the doc means not more than one?i saw that in some website “in another word this one extent mostly”

  3. Kgee says:

    NFS support has changed on vSphere 5.0. It is now supported in vSphere 5.0. It was not supported in vSphere 4.0.

    A is wrong. B is corret.

    Storage I/O Control Requirements
    Storage I/O Control has several requirements and limitations.

    ■ Datastores that are Storage I/O Control-enabled must be managed by a single vCenter Server system.

    ■ Storage I/O Control is supported on Fibre Channel-connected, iSCSI-connected, and NFS-connected storage. Raw Device Mapping (RDM) is not supported.

    ■ Storage I/O Control does not support datastores with multiple extents.

    ■ Before using Storage I/O Control on datastores that are backed by arrays with automated storage tiering capabilities, check the VMware Storage/SAN Compatibility Guide to verify whether your automated tiered storage array has been certified to be compatible with Storage I/O Control.

    Automated storage tiering is the ability of an array (or group of arrays) to migrate LUNs/volumes or parts of LUNs/volumes to different types of storage media (SSD, FC, SAS, SATA) based on user-set policies and current I/O patterns. No special certification is required for arrays that do not have these automatic migration/tiering features, including those that provide the ability to manually migrate data between different types of storage media.

    http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/index.jsp?topic=/com.vmware.vsphere.introduction.doc_50/GUID-F7A7E6C0-FA25-4806-8921-0438F1B2AEAE.html

  4. dinh says:

    Correct answers are: B, D, E
    Storage I/O Control has several requirements and limitations.

    ■ Datastores that are Storage I/O Control-enabled must be managed by a single vCenter Server system.
    ■ Storage I/O Control is supported on Fibre Channel-connected, iSCSI-connected, and NFS-connected storage. Raw Device Mapping (RDM) is not supported.
    ■ Storage I/O Control does not support datastores with multiple extents.
    ■ Before using Storage I/O Control on datastores that are backed by arrays with automated storage tiering capabilities, check the VMware Storage/SAN Compatibility Guide to verify whether your automated tiered storage array has been certified to be compatible with Storage I/O Control.

    Automated storage tiering is the ability of an array (or group of arrays) to migrate LUNs/volumes or parts of LUNs/volumes to different types of storage media (SSD, FC, SAS, SATA) based on user-set policies and current I/O patterns. No special certification is required for arrays that do not have these automatic migration/tiering features, including those that provide the ability to manually migrate data between different types of storage media.

    http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.vmware.vsphere.resmgmt.doc_50%2FGUID-37CC0E44-7BC7-479C-81DC-FFFC21C1C4E3.html

  5. Scott says:

    The problem is that A is correct in this question. its bullet 3 of the diagram everyone keeps posting up. That to enable SIOC, the vmfs datastore can only be a single extent.

    The dump i have from actualtests v.10 lists the A answer as the following…

    A. The datastore must contain multiple VMFS extents

    That is why the B answer makes sense in the question i read, but not in this case. in this case, the A answer is correct AS WELL as the B answer, which is why we are debating it one over the other.

  6. Bob says:

    This is what’s so annoying about professional exams — poor wording that messes with your head. Neither A NOR B is correct when asking what three requirements are in order to use SIOC. “The datastore must contain a single NFS volume” — UNTRUE! I have many SIOC-enabled datatstores that do not contain a single NFS volume. Most do not contain any NFS volumes at all.

  7. thambone says:

    They are trying to trick you. Look at A again, it says
    “The datastore must contain a single VMFS extent”
    See the word “must” in this sentence? That’s what makes it wrong. the datastore MAY contain a single VMFS extent, but it can also contain no VMFS extents. Meaning the word must makes statement A incorrect.

  8. Rich says:

    Neither A or B are correct. The word “must” disqualifies both.

    A. Should state “The Datastore cannot have more than a single VMFS extent”

    B. Should state “The Datastore may be an NFS volume”.

    Then either one would be correct.

    Does VMWare have anybody check the validity of these questions?


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