Which two conditions would explain the loss of network connectivity for the virtual machine?

An administrator determines that a virtual machine configured for the Development port group lost network connectivity when it was migrated with vMotion from one ESXi 5.x host to another. The administrator notices that machines configured for the Production port group are not experiencing the issue. The hosts have port groups with the following network configuration:

Host A:

1. Production (VLAN 100)

2. Development

Host B:

1. Production (VLAN 100)

2. Development (VLAN 200)

Which two conditions would explain the loss of network connectivity for the virtual machine? (Choose two.)

A.
An improper native VLAN is configured on the uplinks to Host B.

B.
An improper native VLAN is configured on the uplinks to Host A.

C.
The configured VLAN for Development on Host B is incorrect.

D.
The configured VLAN for Development on Host A is incorrect.

9 Comments on “Which two conditions would explain the loss of network connectivity for the virtual machine?

  1. Francesco says:

    This question is really strange because I think that it could be more than one answer.
    What do you think?
    Problem could also come from the fact that configured VLAN on Development Host B is incorrect no?

  2. test says:

    The problem occurs only AFTER the migration to the new host. Nothing was wrong with the setup BEFORE migration from Host A.

    This means don’t change anything on Host A.

    Hence answer B,D could not be right.

  3. Vess says:

    B and C is right. If the VM was working ok on host A, that means the VLAN on Development network on host B is incorrect. If the VM was working on host B, then the native VLAN on host A. Host A does not use VLAN tagging so that means that it’s native VLAN needs to be 200, but it is not.

  4. Rich says:

    They don’t say which host was the source and which was the target for the vMotion. We only know that the problems are with the development VLAN on one or more host. We also know that the Port group settings on both hosts must match. So the problem is with either (or both) Host A’s development port group configuration or Host B’s development port group configuration.

    After that we have a BIG word game!

    I’d assume that there is no ‘configured VLAN’ for host A’s development port group and that what they mean by ‘native VLAN is configured on the uplinks’ means ‘physical switch port VLAN configuration’. Then the answers would be B & C.

    However, since the VLAN configuration must match you could also argue that either host A’s development port group VLAN configuration is wrong and that it should be set to VLAN 200, or that Host B’s Development Port group VLAN configuration (and physical switch port configuration) is wrong and should be set to no VLAN, in which case C & D would be the answer.

    In short, this is another bogus question.

  5. Steve says:

    As there is insufficient information in the question then all answers are technically correct. The reason it could any answer as it doesn’t state what vlan should be used for each port group. The uplink on the physical switch interface to host A could be set to allow vlan 100 and 500 with a native vlan of 200. This means host A’s conifg is correct and only answers applicable would be A and C. Or flip it around, Host B has a physical switch uplink config of allow vlan 100,200 and native vlan is 500. This would mean the correct answer is B and D as the native should be set to 200 or the port group should tag 200. I would guess the answers they were looking for B and D and the assumption was it migrated from Host B to Host A.


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