Which two statements are true about this configuration?

A vSphere 5 implementation contains two ESXi hosts, ESXi01and ESXi02. A virtual machine, VM21a on ESXi01 is connected to a vSphere Standard Switch (vSS) in a port group called Production. The vSS is connected to an uplink on the 10.1.20.0/24 network. ESXi02 is configured with a vSS connected to an uplink on the 10.1.20.0/24 network. A port group called Engineering exists on this switch.

Which two statements are true about this configuration? (Choose two.)

A.
The virtual machine can not be vMotion migrated to the target host.

B.
Broadcasts from the Production port group can not be received on the Engineering port group.

C.
The virtual machine can be vMotion migrated to the target host.

D.
Broadcasts from the Production port group can be received on the Engineering port group.

4 Comments on “Which two statements are true about this configuration?

  1. Jon says:

    Can anyone explain why B is correct and not D? I’ve looked at this question posted in several different places and they all list A and B as the correct answers, but I can’t for the life of me understand why.

    Even though the port groups have different names, they are in the same broadcast domain. A broadcast sent from a VM on the esxi01 host would travel out on to the network and then in to esi02 since they are on the same net. There is nothing in that packet that would tell esxi02 to drop it because it came from a different port group. At least, that’s what I think anyway. Does anyone else agree or can anyone explain why that is not correct?

  2. HE says:

    A & B is correct

    Each port group is identified by a network label, which is unique to the current host. Network labels are used
    to make virtual machine configuration portable across hosts. All port groups in a datacenter that are physically
    connected to the same network (in the sense that each can receive broadcasts from the others) are given the
    same label. Conversely, if two port groups cannot receive broadcasts from each other, they have distinct labels.

  3. Rich says:

    The Correct answer is A & D in this case. This question is similar to, but not the same as other questions on this test. In this case the two uplinks are on the same subnet and there is no mention of any VLAN configuration. So broadcasts would be recieved.

    HE’s explanation is wrong. It should say “All port groups in a datacenter that are physically connected to the same network (in the sense that each can receive broadcasts from the others) SHOULD BE GIVEN the same label.”

    The labeling in and of itself will not determine how broadcasts are handled. That’s going to be determined by the subnet and VLAN configuration.

    Of course VMWare may want you to assume that if two port groups have different labels then you can expect that they have different VLANS, but I don’t think that that’s necessarily true.


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