Verifying GRP Tunnels 

As usual I’ll start with my favorite troubleshooting command,  show  ip  interface  brief . 

Corp# sh  ip  int  brief  

Interface                IP-Address            OK?  Method  Status                                

Protocol  

FastEthernet0/0    10.10.10.5            YES  manual  up                                        

up  

Serial0/0                63.1.1.1                YES  manual  up                                        

up  

FastEthernet0/1    unassigned            YES  unset    administratively  down  

down  

Serial0/1                unassigned            YES  unset    administratively  down  

down  

Tunnel0                    192.168.10.1        YES  manual  up                                        

up  

In this output, you can see that the tunnel interface is now showing as  an interface on my router. You can see the IP address of the tunnel  interface, and the Physical and Data Link status show as up/up. So far  so good. Let’s take a look at the interface with the  show  interfaces  tunnel  0  command. 

Corp# sh  int  tun  0  

Tunnel0  is  up,  line  protocol  is  up  

    Hardware  is  Tunnel  

    Internet  address  is  192.168.10.1/24  

    MTU  1514  bytes,  BW  9  Kbit,  DLY  500000  usec,  

          reliability  255/255,  txload  1/255,  rxload  1/255  

   Encapsulation  TUNNEL ,  loopback  not  set  

    Keepalive  not  set  

   Tunnel  source  63.1.1.1,  destination  63.1.1.2  

   Tunnel  protocol/transport  GRE/IP  

        Key  disabled,  sequencing  disabled  

        Checksumming  of  packets  disabled  

    Tunnel  TTL  255  

    Fast  tunneling  enabled  

    Tunnel  transmit  bandwidth  8000  (kbps)  

    Tunnel  receive  bandwidth  8000  (kbps)  

The  show  interfaces  command shows the configuration settings and  the interface status as well as the IP address, tunnel source, and  destination address. The output also shows the tunnel protocol, which 

is GRE/IP. Last, let’s take a look at the routing table with the  show  ip  route  command. 

Corp# sh  ip  route  

[output  cut]  

          192.168.10.0/24  is  subnetted,  2  subnets  

C            192.168.10.0/24  is  directly  connected,  Tunnel0  

L            192.168.10.1/32  is  directly  connected,  Tunnel0  

          63.0.0.0/30  is  subnetted,  2  subnets  

C            63.1.1.0  is  directly  connected,  Serial0/0  

L            63.1.1.1/32  is  directly  connected,  Serial0/0  

The  tunnel0  interface shows up as a directly connected interface, and  although it’s a logical interface, the router treats it as a physical  interface, just like serial 0/0 in the routing table. 

Corp# ping  192.168.10.2  

Type  escape  sequence  to  abort.  

Sending  5,  100-byte  ICMP  Echos  to  192.168.10.2,  timeout  is  2  

seconds:  

!!!!!  

Success  rate  is  100  percent  (5/5)  

Did you notice that I just pinged 192.168.10.2 across the Internet? I  hope so! Anyway, there’s one last thing I want to cover before we move  on to EBGP, and that’s troubleshooting an output, which is showing a  tunnel routing error. If you configure your GRE tunnel and receive this  GRE flapping message 

                    Line  protocol  on  Interface  Tunnel0,  changed  state  to  up  

07:11:55:  %TUN-5-RECURDOWN:  

                    Tunnel0  temporarily  disabled  due  to  recursive  routing  

07:11:59:  %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN:  

                    Line  protocol  on  Interface  Tunnel0,  changed  state  to  

down  

07:12:59:  %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN:  

it means that you’ve misconfigured your tunnel, which will cause your  router to try and route to the tunnel destination address using th e  tunnel interface itself! 

Single-Homed EBGP 

The  Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)  is perhaps one of the most well-  known routing protocols in the world of networking. This is  understandable because BGP is the routing protocol that powers the  Internet and makes possible what we take for granted: connecting to  remote systems on the other side of the country or planet. Because of  its pervasive use, it’s likely that each of us will have to deal with it at  some point in our careers. So it’s appropriate that we spend some time  learning about BGP. 

BGP version 4 has a long and storied history. Although the most recent  definition was published in 1995 as RFC 1771 by Rekhter and Li, BGP’s 

roots can be traced back to RFCs 827 and 904, which specified a  protocol called the exterior gateway protocol (EGP). These earlier  specifications date from 1982 and 1984, respectively—ages ago!  Although BGP obsoletes EGP, it uses many of the techniques fir st  defined by EGP and draws upon the many lessons learned from its  use. 

Way back in 1982, many organizations were connected to the  ARPAnet, the noncommercial predecessor of the Internet. When a  new network was added to ARPAnet, it would typically be added in a  relatively unstructured way and would begin participating in a 

common routing protocol, the Gateway to Gateway Protocol (GGP). As  you might expect, this solution did not scale well. GGP suffered from  excessive overhead in managing large routing tables and from the  difficulty of troubleshooting in an environment in which there was no  central administrative control. 

To address these deficiencies, EGP was developed, and with it the  concept of  autonomous systems (ASs) . RFC 827 was very clear in  laying out the problems with GGP and in pointing out that a new type  of routing protocol was required, an  exterior gateway protocol (EGP) .  The purpose of this new protocol was to facilitate the flow of traffic  among a series of autonomous systems by exchanging information  about routes contained in each system. The complexities of this  network of networks, the Internet, would be hidden from the end user  contains a 

 Comparison of BGP and OSPF  who simply views the Internet as a single address space through which they travel, unaware of the exact path they take. 

The BGP that we know today flows directly from this work on EGP and  builds upon it. So that you can get a better understanding of BGP, I 

will provide an overview of its features next. 

Site Search:

Close

Close
Download Free Demo of VCE
Exam Simulator

Experience Avanset VCE Exam Simulator for yourself.


Simply submit your e-mail address below to get started with our interactive software demo of your free trial.


Enter Your Email Address

Free Demo Limits: In the demo version you will be able to access only first 5 questions from exam.